The UN Seahorse in Japan!
Commemorating the Year of the Ocean
The Climate in Japan

The Japan islands extend through approximately 20 degrees of latitude, from 25 degN to 45 degN, and approximately 23 degrees of longitude, from 122 degE to 145 degE. Japan's climatic conditions vary widely. Average mean temperatures range from about 5C (about 41F) in Nemuro, Hokkaido, to about 16C (about 61F) on Okinawa. Short summers and long, severe winters characterize Hokkaido and the northern part of Honshu. The severity of the winters is caused in great part by the northwestern winds blowing from Siberia and the cold Oyashio Current, which flows south into the Sea of Japan.

The typhoon season in Japan lasts from July to October, which sees about 70% of the total number of typhoon that land on the Japanese islands.

Japan has four distinct seasons of summer, autumn, winter and spring. Many cultural events in Japan revolve around the changing seasons. Most famous among them are the Sakura parties, when flood lit blooming Sakura (or cherry blossoms) are appreciated by having parties under such trees! Weather forecasts during the start of the spring also include contour lines drawn across the country that show dates when the Sakura would bloom. And it does bloom on those dates!!

Sapporo is to the north, Tokyo is in central Japan and Kagoshima is to the South.

COP3 - Climate Change and Japan

Global warming, CO2 emissions, and subsequent negative climate changes have put considerable pressure on Japan to reduce its CO2 emissions. Japan pledged to a reduction of emissions to 7% of 1990 levels before the year 2010. Among the measure that Japan is planning to reduce CO2 emissions are modifications to the Basic Environmental Law, public awareness generation, voluntary initiatives by industry, and CO2 trading permits.


Note: Japan standard Time (JST) is 9 hours ahead of GMT.
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Contact: Hari Srinivas - oceans@gdrc.org